Wound Care

In the United States, chronic wounds affect around 6.5 million patients. The incidence of chronic wounds is growing rapidly due an aging population and a sharp rise in the incidence of diabetes and other underlying medical conditions that impair the body’s ability to heal. Early detection and proper wound care evaluation, treatment and management is essential to help optimize healing and reduce the risk of hospitalization and surgical intervention. Below is a list of several different types of wounds that we treat as well as some information on what to expect to help prepare you for an evaluation.

Types of Wounds Treated

  • Diabetic foot ulcerations
  • Venous leg ulcerations
  • Arterial ulcers
  • Pressure ulcers
  • Traumatic wounds

Diabetic (Neuropathic) Foot Ulcers

  • Most common ulcer of the diabetic foot
  • 15% of diabetics develop a foot ulcer
  • Between 12%-24% of those with foot ulcerations require some form of amputation
  • Diabetes is the leading cause of non-traumatic amputation in the United States
  • Largely due to increased pressure and friction in an insensate foot

Venous Leg Ulcers

  • Due to abnormal vein function (damaged veins, blood clots, injury, aging)
  • Symptoms: swelling, red irritated skin, tiredness in legs
  • Need elevation, compression, wound care and possible vascular intervention

Arterial Ulcers

  • Chronic ulcer due to poor circulation and atherosclerosis
  • Often Painful
  • Typically found in distal extremities around foot and ankle

Pressure Ulcers

  • Localized injury to the skin and underlying soft tissues as a result of pressure, or in combination with shear and friction
  • Need OFFLOADING

Reasons Wounds Fail to Heal

  • Inadequate perfusion/circulation to the site
  • Infection
  • Edema/Swelling
  • Inadequate nutrition
  • Inhibited cellular activity
  • Diminished growth factors
  • Uncontrolled exudate/drainage
  • Inadequate debridement
  • Wound bed is too dry
  • Inadequate pressure relief

Goals and Treatments for Non-Healing Wounds

  • Assess the patient and characterize the wound
  • Ensure adequate oxygen and perfusion/blood flow
  • Ensure adequate nutrition
  • Treat infection if present
  • Debridement of wound bed - removes bio burden and helps reduce infection risks
  • Remove foreign bodies
  • Offloading of wound bed
  • Provide a moist wound bed through various topical agents and local dressings
  • Compression management for swelling
  • Skin substitutes and grafting
  • Mange pain
  • Baseline labs
  • X-ray to rule out underlying bone involvement and to adequately address underlying anatomy
  • Vascular work up
  • Possible referrals: Vascular surgeon, Infectious Disease, PCP, Nutritionists
  • Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is an intervention in which an individual breathes 100% oxygen intermittently while inside a hyperbaric chamber that is pressurized to greater than sea level pressure (1 atmosphere absolute {ATA}).

Hyperbaric therapy increases the solubility of oxygen in the blood helping to provide increase oxygen and nutrients to tissues of the distal extremity.  In addition hyperbaric therapy has been shown to assist in new blood vessel formation and helps to reduce infection thus promoting wound healing. 

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Our Locations

2 Louisville Locations

Office Hours

Our Regular Schedule

Main Office

Monday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

Closed

Thursday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

9:00 am-3:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

University Office

Monday:

Closed

Tuesday:

Closed

Wednesday:

1:00 pm-5:00 pm

Thursday:

Closed

Friday:

Closed

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed